Home and design

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

There are many tools for the most accurate calculation of building materials, but after construction, not only waste is generated, but also the remains of blocks.

Aerated concrete blocks are one of the most demanded construction materials in private buildings, widely used for the construction of capital houses, summer cottages, baths, garages and other buildings.

How to use the remains of aerated concrete blocks

  • Variants of using aerated concrete breakage
  • Small forms from the remains of gas blocks
  • Garden sculptures
  • Interior and facade applications
  • Aerated concrete stairs
  • Output

This can be a pallet or even several whole material, or a bulkhead with defects. But in any case, the money has been paid and simply taking the blocks to the landfill is a waste; no wonder, “saved, count, earned.” It is quite possible to save in a situation with the remains of aerated concrete blocks, we will consider both the obvious and original methods.


Variants of using aerated concrete breakage

Even when ordering a “tube to tube”, when processing gas silicate, like any material, waste remains – trimming, rejection, battle. They can be used in a variety of ways.

As a filler in concreting – for example, when filling fixing holes in floor slabs, and similar structures where it is necessary to reduce the consumption of mortar. Gas silicate rubble is not inferior in characteristics to brick.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

As a basis for repair mortars, crushed battle is added to the adhesive mixture and seams and masonry defects are sealed with this composition. In a liquid consistency, it can also be used as a primer for preparing walls for plastering. As a preparation for pouring screed, filling.


Small forms from the remains of gas blocks

Gazosilicate is used to lay out gazebos (completely or one or two blank walls), campfire zones, outdoor stoves and stove complexes, frames for furniture in outdoor kitchens, and the like.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

In addition, the blocks are useful for forming or strengthening retaining walls.
And also, they make all kinds of garden furniture, whether it is solid or combined with wood benches and table bases.

The only limitation is your own imagination.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste


Garden sculptures

A rather original way of using the remains is offered by the manufacturers of aerated concrete – the creation of garden sculptures.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

Due to its porous structure, the material is easy to handle by hand and takes the desired shape without excessive effort.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

The optimum density of aerated concrete for creating sculptures is D300-400, the five hundredth is more difficult to process, but also realistic. The width is a certain limitation, for the remains it is usually 300-375 mm, but it is quite enough for maneuver.

Even without having artistic taste and modeling skills, it is quite possible to recreate simple figures using templates downloaded from the network.

The set of tools is minimal:

  • Aerated concrete hand saw (with soldered teeth).
  • Bit.
  • Mallet (wooden or rubber).
  • Rasp.

Finished products practically do not need fine-tuning – they can simply be painted or treated with a water repellent, since the characteristic surface of the block is decorative in itself.


Interior and facade applications

From gas blocks, you can lay out not only rough interior partitions, but also open shelving and storage systems, bar counters, coasters and shelves for indoor plants and decor. They are also used for laying decorative fireplaces, frames of kitchen sets and work areas.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

In the bathroom, bases for shower trays, bathrooms and sinks are made of silicate gas.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste

An equally interesting option is the design of window and door openings in rooms or on facades. The blocks are sawn into plates (3-4 cm thick), processed, giving the desired shape, and the resulting decor is glued to a specialized mixture or glue-foam to the base. In the future, “stucco molding” is putty with a finishing compound and painted – unlike typical polyurethane moldings, this will be an exclusive one-off copy.


Aerated concrete stairs

No handicraft – the construction of aerated concrete stairs was developed by block manufacturers and posted in the albums of technical solutions. Staircase elements are made of a high-density aerated block of a characteristic shape; mounted on a retaining wall, if there is no load-bearing wall, or laid on a corner mounted in a load-bearing wall, if available.

What to do with the remains of aerated concrete: the second life of construction waste


Output

Both the battle and the remains of the blocks are universal. They will be useful both for concreting, and for interior decoration, and for landscaping the local area. Why spend money on additional materials when you can use leftovers with virtually no restrictions. As practice shows, gas silicate does not need special storage conditions and it is quite possible to stack it in a secluded place and use it as needed, both as a whole and pre-grind. published by econet.ru

Subscribe to our Yandex Zen channel!

If you have any questions on this topic, ask the specialists and readers of our project here.

PS And remember, just by changing your consumption – together we are changing the world! © econet


READ  The eaves overhang changes the architecture of the house

Похожие записи

Operation of radiators in questions and answers

Cordelia King

Pond or pool – “splash pool”

Cordelia King

The eaves overhang changes the architecture of the house

Cordelia King

Leave a Comment